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For discussion of urban legends, the paranormal, and the just plain strange.
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The Psychology of Creepypasta and the Mythos Spawned

Sat Jul 06, 2013 4:18 pm

A large part of the reason the Creepypastas have become so popular is, aside from entertainment value, well-written Pastas tend to tap into the reader's inner fear or subconscious. One of the most famous examples is Slenderman, who has become extremely mainstream to the point where my phone does not attempt to autocorrect the word and where many complain Slendy is overused). But a main reason he became so intriguing comes from one of the most primal fears humanity has: the unknown lurking in the darkness. Slenderman has no concrete origins or is even fully dismissable; many have been spooked out by him, if only because he is a personification of the bogeymen children fear. He's, at his rawest form, the creature parents would be apt to warn about had he been actual mythology.

A lot of what we view as disturbing or scary is seen often in Pastas (well written or no). Mutilation, the unknown, the dark, twisting our childhood memories to something gritty and ominous... This can speak a lot about how society works.

In my experience, having been through boughts of depression and homicidal urges coming off of that, the Creepypastas I would write in an attempt to vent were, quite frankly, rather disturbing for the works of a thirteen-year-old girl still in middle school. I used to write revenge stories, in which something like Slenderman or Jeff the Killer would torture and murder those who had bullied me for years.

I don't write such stories anymore, but I'm curious as to what this may say about humanity. Could my writings have been simply adolescant wangst? Or, had I locked up my emotions on the inside, would have I eventually become some sort of twisted individual who would be a vicious murderer?

Am I simply reading too much into myself? Or trying too hard to interpret society? How much is Creepypasta pure fun? How much is Creepypasta a way of viewing society's primal figures (in the Rake, in Slenderman, etc.)? Or a way of reading other people's disturbing fantasies?

I'm quite interested to hear what others have to say about this subject. If this is too idiotic a topic or doesn't belong in this sub-board, mods, feel free to lock or move it as needed.

Re: The Psychology of Creepypasta and the Mythos Spawned

Sun Jul 07, 2013 3:09 am

Lambert, it's not idiotic, and I'd say it's a very interesting topic.

About revenge stories, there was a French movie about a writer who imagines himself as some sort of a superspy who kills bad guys who all represent his real life enemies (their leader is, of course, his own publisher). I also think that the only reason some people like Jeff the killer story is that it fits a certain teenage worldview with annoying and uncaring parents, school bullies ascending the level of movie villains, video game like fights, cartoonish lines etc. I believe you won't become a murderer, because you gave out your rage into the paper, and everything will pass away.

I don't agree about slenderman as an embodiment of fear of the unknown, as he is actually the opposite of that. He's popular, because he is a familiar figure, like a bad guy who appears in many episodes of some tv show, and who has as much fans as the main characters. As for the fear of the unknown, I think it was better portrayed in Ghastly Tales's Bedtime, where the monster is not even identified by any kind of name.

I wouldn't try to use any literature to interpret the society mostly because everyone reads the stories in his own way, and the closest thing to some sort of analysis would be analyzing yourself while reading a story. What scared me? What annoyed me? etc.

Re: The Psychology of Creepypasta and the Mythos Spawned

Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:25 pm

That's some deep **** right thurr, Lambert.

One thing that jumped to my mind when you started talking about the website as a reflection of society: to be a reflection of an entire society everyone in the society would have to be using it, or else it's not a complete reflection, is it? While creepypasta is popular enough, I don't think I've ever run into anybody in my life face-to-face who knows what it is.

Second, the readers and writers of the site and of this forum I believe come from all over the place, not from any one country, so while the language we all communicate in is English, we're not all from the same "society" to begin with.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that rather than reflecting a change in society, creepypasta just created a place for people who were already into the paranormal and disturbing. The people who use the site liked creepy stuff to begin with, and maybe just didn't have a place to share it till now.

In your case, where your writing became your release of negative feelings, I think you are far from alone. The psychologist Stanley Rachman conducted a study on intrusive thoughts (random thoughts about violence and aggression) and concluded "intrusive thoughts have almost always been a part of the human condition."

So are we a reflection of society? I would say no. Are we a group of slightly crazy people from all over the world who enjoy reading messed up fictional stories? Probably. We just get a release (fellas) of our negative feelings from reading and writing scary literature instead of...playing golf or something.

Re: The Psychology of Creepypasta and the Mythos Spawned

Wed Oct 30, 2013 6:35 am

I have an inexplicable feeling of sadness right now but I want this thread revived. I became very curious and found myself having questions about Creepypasta and me.

I write to release stress, and I could pretty much relate on certain points in this thread. I shift the involved things that are troubling me in a metaphorical parallel universe, like shall we say, something that rips the face of vain people. People around me view me as disturbed in the world of words but I don't think there is really a problem with that. You're not reading too much yourself, you just thought too much to the point that you are now aware of this strange pasta phenomenon and finding people who share the same thoughts.

I hope you can read this, Lambert. A slender hand is reaching out for you (not the pasta one, mine).

Re: The Psychology of Creepypasta and the Mythos Spawned

Mon Jan 23, 2017 8:24 am

I think the design that you think it was right in a way.
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