It is currently Mon Jun 26, 2017 6:35 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]



Welcome
Welcome to Terror Tortellini.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which means you are missing out on a lot of content because you can't see it. By joining us, you will have access to these areas and other features as well. Maybe we're talking about you behind your back and you can't see it because you want to be anonymous. I get it; I really do. But come on, being a member means you can add to the conversations. What do you have to lose? Signing up is free. So give it a try and join up.


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Scotty's Guide To Writing Pasta
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:13 pm 
Offline
Butthurt
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:20 pm
Posts: 1084
Location: Fuck Knows
This one time, I went to University and got a degree in literature.

With that in mind, here's a thread devoted to teaching you the ins-and-outs of writing creepypasta. Whether or not you use the guide, this is worth reading before you sit down to write your first story. It'll give you some hints and tips and explain what's needed for a successful horror-short-story.

These are really just my own thoughts; much of the advice was coined randomly via my own experiences. I am not a widely published author and my pastas are sub-par. I admit this. But I do know literature. Unfortunately, it’s pretty much the only thing I know.

I can't teach you how to write a list of Shakespearean works, I’m simply giving you advice on what to do before you start licking the keyboard. If anybody disagrees, you may shit on this. I will allow it!

Part 1 - The 4 P's - Premise, Plot, Person and Purpose

1.1 - Premise
1.2 - Plot
1.3 - Person
1.4 - Purpose
1.5 - The Pasta Metaphor, Extended

Part 2 - Quantity vs Quality

2.1 - Length
2.2 - Structure

(more to come)

_________________
Giggles wrote:
3 reasons 2 b druid
1. durids can poop wher ethey want
2.
3.


Report this post
Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: 1.1 - Premise
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:22 pm 
Offline
Butthurt
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:20 pm
Posts: 1084
Location: Fuck Knows
Premise


Hypothesis, Idea, Concept, etc

Premise is your overall foundation for your written work. Premise includes an overview of your plot, setting and characters. Most writers choose one of these aspects as a key starting point and premise is, in fact, the very initial idea that you wish to transform into published fiction. It is – by a not-very-good definition of the word - the initial argument that you will set out. It is your basis, your starting point.

For example:

“A dude wakes up in the woods, he has no idea how he got there, he needs to get out and starts walking in one direction. The woods are creepy and somehow he realises he’s travelling in circles…”

Yeah, okay, that’s a little rough around the edges but it’s still an example. Your premise is your ultimate rough draft. When readers first decide to read your work, the question on their mind is: “what is this story about?” It’s the first thing that grabs their attention.

But it doesn’t stop there.

Premise involves planning; it involves taking the fundamental aspects of story telling to their simplest forms and creating a positive structure with which you can work. Once you have your basis and your creative juices are flowing, you should be able to work out precisely what will happen in your story. That’s the key question for you, friends, and so repeat it to yourself: WHAT IS MY STORY ABOUT?

Spend a little time fine-tuning this idea. It’s the original plan and the original blueprint to stick to when you’re writing. Really ask yourself if the premise is interesting, ask yourself if it can be improved and take your idea and attach a timeline or plan to it. For example, know where your character will travel to and when, know specifically what your plot involves and understand precisely what you are trying to achieve. This need not be complex. The ultimate goal may simply be to tell a chilling tale about an individual trapped in the woods. Go for it. Just don’t lose the original idea along the way.


Artful Tip: Write your premise down. Doing this will allow you to look it over and remind yourself not to get too carried away as you begin to type up your story.

_________________
Giggles wrote:
3 reasons 2 b druid
1. durids can poop wher ethey want
2.
3.


Last edited by Scotty on Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Report this post
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1.2 - Plot
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:32 pm 
Offline
Butthurt
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:20 pm
Posts: 1084
Location: Fuck Knows
Plot

Narrative, Development, Setting etc

So you’ve decided what your story is going to be about. That’s all well and good but now we need a full structure. Your plot is your general setting, the ‘place’, if you will, in which your story will unfold and, more likely, it is the progression of your story. Plot and Person (more on ‘person’ later) are both tied in with each other as the Plot cannot progress without the Person and the Person cannot progress without the Plot. Think of it as a cyclical flow-chart where each is dependent on one another. Plot, in it’s most basic form, is a sequence of events endured by the reader/character that will inevitably form a conclusion.

For example:

“The story takes place entirely in the woods. The dude will simply travel in circles, recognising natural points that he has passed before. As he continues to do this, he slowly grows more confused and terrified. Eventually he will come across an old building that he does not recognise. He will decide to go into the building. Something in the building will kill him.”

Simple enough for creepypasta-based writing, isn’t it? Stop me if you recognise this plot from somewhere else.

You can’t deviate from your plot; this is an unofficial but incredibly important rule of story telling. Bending your narrative to produce a new setting or to force your character into a different situation is called a ‘plot hole’ – see every inch of fan fiction on the Internet for an example of this.

When you create your final plot and establish your setting you are forming the central aspect of your story. A strong plot, one that does not deviate without explanation, is the key to keeping readers interested in your story. When you decide exactly how your story will unfold, you are making the final statement as to the journey that your character – and/or the reader – will be taking and this is significant. Forming your plot shouldn’t be difficult; it will eventually propel you towards an outcome to the story.

There will be KEY THINGS THAT HAPPEN as your story progresses. Sometimes there are one, two or even three of these. These points will be moments of significance that RELATE TO THE ORIGINAL PREMISE of your story. The story is unfolding, the reader is learning things or, at the very least, making speculations. There must be a situational issue to deal with throughout or you will simply right a coherent screed of boring text.

Think of it as a map that subtly answers questions. So, if you had, for example, three specific key aspects in your story, they should provide an explanation as you write. As you move to each new point within the plot, certain questions must be answered.

Point A (where, when)

Point B (where, when, how)

Point C (where, when, how and what)


At Point A, your story takes place somewhere at a certain time. At Point B, your story progresses to a shift in realisation within the setting at a certain time. At Point C, your story progresses towards a conclusion within the setting, at a certain time by the character realising that something is happening or about to happen. The ultimate ending is said ‘something’ actually occurring.

Once you’ve decided on all this, you must try to stick with it as best you can without diverting the narrative to something else. This is about planning, even for the simplest pastas, planning is absolutely necessary and this is why plot is such a key element of the pre-writing brainstorm. You must stick to your plan; you must hold your plot together. Take each important twist and turn in the narrative (no matter how little there are) and make sure that you are prepared to transfer your delivery to the page.



Artful Tip: - Keep it short and sweet. No matter the length of your story, a plot that twists and turns too often is confusing and often does not absorb the reader. Make your plot as easy to follow as you possibly can.

_________________
Giggles wrote:
3 reasons 2 b druid
1. durids can poop wher ethey want
2.
3.


Last edited by Scotty on Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Report this post
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1.3 Person
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:35 pm 
Offline
Butthurt
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:20 pm
Posts: 1084
Location: Fuck Knows
Person

Character, Identity, Role etc
The definitive presence in your story is the character, or, indeed, the group of characters, who take part in the events that unfold within the plot. See now how they’re linked? In short fiction, the character is a representation of humanity and the general link between reader and horror. This is interchangeable. Sometimes the reader is the actual character, sometimes the narrative is a window for the reader to witness an antagonistic character’s motivations, this is fine, and it all links in the end. The character is the individual within your story who interacts with the environment and the plot. They drive the story forward. Sometimes they may be as simple a creation as John Smith from Idaho or, if you’re really coy, they will be made apparent not by name and designation but by background description.

For example:

“The dude glanced down at his shirt, caked in dried vomit. The Nintendo logo was pretty much obscured. He could smell alcohol on himself, lingering evidence of the party he had recently been to. He hauled himself to his feet, realising that one of his sneakers was missing.”

Yeah, I know, it’s another very basic example. But what do you gather about the character? Beyond the fact that he puked and he owns a Nintendo t-shirt, that is. He’s fairly young, at least youthful, probably a gamer in his spare time, perhaps a late high school or college attendee, at least somebody who likes big parties and a good drink. Vague, yes I know that too, but it’s all that’s required. The humanity is present. He has been ill, he is missing a sneaker, he is disorientated etc.

There are two very simple things to bear in mind when it comes to coining your character.

1.) Realism

2.) Consistency

Keep your characters believable. It’s important that you (and your audience) can relate to the individual who is in the situation detailed by the plot. There has to be some link, some understanding. No sixth sense, no superhuman powers and no sudden and random understanding of the plot. People don’t do that. Your audience has a tenuous interest in the plot and a huge level of investment in the character. No matter how fantastic your antagonist is, how brutal your twist is or how gory your descriptions are, the character is the witness and if the character is not the reader then they must have as limited an understanding of their situation as is required.

Then there’s consistency. This should always be applied when you deviate and, as I mentioned earlier, perhaps provide a window into an antagonist’s mind. Consistency is simple – your character should not, for any reason, change. Going from being a drunken frat boy to a badass ninja is just not acceptable. The personality must remain the same; the very nature of their presence in the plot is the only questionable aspect of the character whatsoever. Characters in short fiction have to be relatable; it’s the only way that short fiction (particularly short fiction with heavy imagery, such as horror) will ever have impact upon its readers. A random change in persona will break stride. Keep the emotional bearing and the thought-process on one solid level.

Again, character completely comes down to planning. More often than not, character will be the first thing you think of in any story. It’s incredibly significant, as I keep stressing, because it’s the link between audience and plot. The plot will affect your character, it will change their mood and it will cause them to react. Create your character with that in mind, develop the persona as one that will be able to stay in synch with your original premise and who will fit into the plot you have devised.


Artful Tip: - Try to relate your character's to yourself or people that you know. The best way to be concise with character creation is to make them as believable as possible, this works well if you think of people you encounter in your day to day life.

_________________
Giggles wrote:
3 reasons 2 b druid
1. durids can poop wher ethey want
2.
3.


Last edited by Scotty on Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Report this post
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1.4 Purpose
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:39 pm 
Offline
Butthurt
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:20 pm
Posts: 1084
Location: Fuck Knows
Purpose

Intent, Objective, Message etc

The final aspect of short story telling is the key to success. Purpose is simply the overall goal that you hoped to achieve, the goal that you outlined when you first created your story’s premise. Every good short story has a poignant moral applied, no matter how vague it seems or how unimportant in relation to the plot it actually is.

For creepypasta’s these are usually things like don’t fuck with ouija boards or don’t go camping in the woods and those are just perfect. Many authors don’t initially have an overall purpose beyond creeping out their audience. However, the final message is there and the purpose is delivered through impact. We commonly know this as “A TWIST” or “A PUNCHLINE”, the process of sending the final chill down the reader’s spine. Purpose is just as simple as this. It’s about having an ultimate goal for the audience.

For example:

“He stopped in the doorway, his eyes refusing to fully adjust to the light. Trying to control his breathing he moved forward, extending a hand and groping through the darkness for a wall, a piece of furniture, anything stable. It collided with something loose, a fabric of some kind. He groped something solid within and ran his hands downwards until they touched the cold skin of a bare, human foot.”

Yeah, yeah, yeah, my example story is still shit. Fair enough. Point is that there is the delivery of purpose within this example paragraph. Our protagonist/character has encountered death. There’s your punch line, there’s your clear-cut ending.

The fact is that short stories don’t work without a planned and prepared ending. This is where so many new creepypasta writers will falter. They will begin with a strong premise, create a pleasant character and stick to a reasonable plot but will be unable to end it. If there is one piece of advice I can give you, it’s not to begin writing a full draft of your story until you are certain of the conclusion you want to reach. When you plan this conclusion think of the Purpose of your story. What message does it send to the reader? What effect does it have on the audience? Has your character reached a clear and easily definable goal?

This all goes back to planning. Take your time, pace out each part of your story and fundamentally have each of your 4 P’s prepared. Purpose is the most important as it is the overall aftertaste that your reader is going to experience. I would advise all knew writers to come up with the ending first. If that is, at all, possible.


Artful Tip: - Try to weave your Purpose into the narrative without actually saying it out loud. Make it poignant that the general moral of the story is to avoid the horror that the character has undertaken.

_________________
Giggles wrote:
3 reasons 2 b druid
1. durids can poop wher ethey want
2.
3.


Last edited by Scotty on Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Report this post
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 1.5 - Extended Metaphor
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:42 pm 
Offline
Butthurt
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:20 pm
Posts: 1084
Location: Fuck Knows
EXTENDING THE PASTA METAPHOR

A humorous He pulled a knife on me, I swear. version of the first post for those of you who are too lazy to deal with my ramblings. Please note that I would never create this and that I don’t know if it would be worth putting both onion and garlic into a creamy, slightly cheesy sauce. I usually just put shit in the oven and it cooks. Easy done.


1.) Premise

You want to cook Spaghetti Carbonara that isn’t too creamy and mild, one that perhaps has a slightly sharper after taste. You’ll need Spaghetti, a saucepan with water, some sauce and some seasoning.

2.) Plot

The Spaghetti will have to be boiled in water until soft and ready for consumption. The ingredients for the sauce - cream, mushrooms, ham, cheese, sliced onion – will have to be added gradually to another saucepan, heated up until well-cooked and consistent. You will then have to add the sauce to the spaghetti to create the full meal.

3.) Person

You will have to smell and taste the sauce as it is being cooked to make sure it has reached the right consistency and has the right flavour. A little flick of your tongue until it is thick and gooey and you can shovel some in your mouth. You will decide to put a light sprinkling of garlic into the food.

4.) Purpose

You have created an edible meal that leaves a nice, sharp after-taste but is consistently creamy and pleasant as well as filling. You should totally make this carbonara again - next time you might get laid.

_________________
Giggles wrote:
3 reasons 2 b druid
1. durids can poop wher ethey want
2.
3.


Report this post
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 2.1 Length
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:45 pm 
Offline
Butthurt
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:20 pm
Posts: 1084
Location: Fuck Knows
Length

Esteemed cleaver-of-the-skies, Overman, once hypothesised that there were two breeds of creepypasta. He called one ‘flash-fiction’ and the other ‘story telling’ or words to that effect. Flash-fiction is your classic creepypasta, impacting short story with a punch line or twist and the other is a long, drawn out horror story that relies mostly on suspense and description. He was dead right with this and the observation remains commendable to this day. It’s something we all should observe. Seriously, fucking observe it.

Unfortunately the latter of the two tends to be the result of a writer’s over-thinking or their inability to plan the initial short story that they had intended to create. They might start with an initial idea, begin to thrash it out and after three paragraphs they may be unable to reach a suitable ending or to sustain a moderate setting and plot. It doesn’t mean that longer story telling doesn’t work, it just lacks the ‘oomph’ of flash fiction and it generally results in cries of “He pulled a knife on me, I swear., motherfucker”.

However, there are many longer stories out there in the pasta realms. Many enjoy ViolentHarvest’s Necropostuff works or that story called Psychosis by some guy whose name I can’t remember. Archfeared, from Monolith, was a regular writer of long horror fiction and it was often effective enough. Just bear in mind that there are differences and that the general idea is often to provoke fear. Whether that is sharp and unexpected or long and tense is YOUR choice.

Just make sure you don’t lose your audience. Have a clear structure and keep an eye on your ‘wandering fingers’ and I don’t mean scratching your pubes. I mean your ability to bring a section of a story to a swift close. When you’ve finished writing it, you better read it three or four times. If there are paragraphs and lumps of dialogue or text that seem unnecessary, don’t hesitate - just delete them. Don’t force your audience through useless information. You detract from the story and you kill the tension.

With ‘flash-fiction’ make sure that you aren’t focusing too highly on one area. Don’t talk about the gorgeous smell of ham for an entire paragraph; don’t discuss the physics of Disneyland or focus too much on what a character is wearing. Keep it simple and descriptive, as if you were telling the story to a colleague at lunch break. Point after point, get straight to the impact as smoothly as you can. Again, read and re-read. You might have to ADD something just to improve upon it. Whilst you want to keep things short and sweet, your audience has to be aware of what is going on.

_________________
Giggles wrote:
3 reasons 2 b druid
1. durids can poop wher ethey want
2.
3.


Report this post
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: 2.2 - Structure
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:46 pm 
Offline
Butthurt
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:20 pm
Posts: 1084
Location: Fuck Knows
Structure

Paragraphs, paragraphs and more paragraphs.

It’s the most basic technique to bear in mind when you’re posting up short stories for review by others. Go find a novel somewhere in your room, open it up and take a good look at it. It’s actually very well structured, isn’t it? There’s a new paragraph every four or five lines, the new paragraph is indented and the text is evenly spaced to make it easier to break into sections. You need to bear this in mind when you’re writing creepypasta, no matter how long it is. People have to be able to clearly read what is there. Otherwise they will be forced to look at a ‘wall of text’ that becomes monotonous and tiring for the eyes.

So break out the return key and feel free to start breaking your story into paragraphs. In fact, if you’re clever, you should plan your story by the paragraph. Each new character realisation or plot description is deserving of it’s own four to five lines, depending on the length of the story. Break it up evenly, LEAVE A SPACE BETWEEN THE PARAGRAPHS and make sure the story looks pleasant on the screen before you go tossing it out there for the creepypasta vultures to pick apart.

The same goes for dialogue. Whilst you will have long-running sentences and, most certainly, a fairly long stream of consciousness from characters at times, it is important to mark these as such. Break it up.

Shorter and snappier dialogue should look something like this:

“You’re a douchebag, Brian.”

“Oh fuck you, Cindy, okay? Fuck you!” He spat the words bitterly.

“Pull over,” she said.”


Longer dialogue, where a character is being descriptive or informative, should look like this:

“I was just standing there, staring out of the window through the rain. I couldn’t believe how dark the street seemed, it must have been close to two or three in the afternoon and this is August,” I explained, feeling myself staring into space. “The rain seemed to just blot the entire city out. As if it were black, you know?”

Split it all up, keep it separate and make it clear to the reader. A lot of people are going to skim your stories at first; they won’t be sucked in initially. If you space your paragraphs well and keep your dialogue separate, noticing that quality will be enough to convince a reader to go back to the start and take a closer look.

_________________
Giggles wrote:
3 reasons 2 b druid
1. durids can poop wher ethey want
2.
3.


Report this post
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
suspicion-preferred